Friends Of Baynes Sound Society

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Valley aquaculture expansion in the works – From hqcomoxvalley.com

Thursday, August 22, 2013 – 1:52 PM
By Marc Mulvaney
Comox

A vote of confidence from Comox Town Council on plans for a major expansion of the Comox Valley’s aquaculture sector by the Komox First Nation.

“The six applications equate to about 515 hectares,” explained Richard Hardy in a presentation on behalf of local first nations to Comox Council at their regular Wednesday night meeting.

“Once you get your crop rotations set up, you’ll be harvesting probably 50 hectares annually, which will generate a million dollars per hectare, but of course there are a lot of costs associated with that.”

Hardy cautioned this venture will definitely not happen overnight.

“Geoducks will take about eight to ten years to grow, so over that period of time there will be a significant amount of money put into this. At the end of the day we are looking at taking a 30-million dollar aquaculture industry in the Baynes Sound area, to an 80-million dollar industry annually in the next 8 to 10 years, if we are able to get this going.”

Responding to an inquiry from Councillor Ken Grant on the potential impact of the operation on recreational water activity, Hardy says based on the depth of harvesting operations, there will be no issues whatsoever.

Comox Council agreed to write a letter of support for the expansion to higher levels of government.

From:  http://hqcomoxvalley.com/news/local/news/v/Local/248527/Valley-aquaculture-expansion-in-the-works

3 responses to “Valley aquaculture expansion in the works – From hqcomoxvalley.com

  1. E. Johnston August 23, 2013 at 3:58 pm

    Geoduck culture is extremely harmful to the marine ecosystem and will turn beaches into factories- be careful what you wish for!!!!!!

    • T. Russell September 5, 2013 at 11:29 am

      I would really like to know what science E. Johnston is basing his comment on. Putting a clam into the sand and returning 8-10 years later to dig it up sure sounds like an environmental catastrophe to me. 😉.Honestly, geoduck culture is probably the lowest impact of any agriculture or aquaculture endeavor.

  2. James Brown October 23, 2013 at 12:32 pm

    People like E. Johnston should learn the facts before speaking out.

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